Stop! Before you water,

Did you make sure the top of the soil is dry yet? 

Having the top couple inches soil dry out in between watering is crucial. This is because if the top couple inches of the soil is not dry, that most likely means that the rest of the soil is still moist, if not, wet.

Watering when the soil is still moist can cause over-watering. Over-watering is the most common reason that causes a plant to die, it is caused by constantly filling up the pores of the soil with water which causes the roots incapability to breath (yes, roots need to breath).

Plant nurseries often asks customers to water when the first few inches of their plant is dry. This is because when the top layer of soil dries, then that means the rest of the soil is at the optimum moisture level for you to water.

*** Buyers should be aware that not all size planters dry at the same rate. For example, 4" planters will dry faster than a 10" planter, and thereby, should be watered more often. The reason to the different is pretty obvious, because there are more soil in the 10" planter than the 4", that's why the smaller planter will dry faster. 

As a general guidance, 

4" Plants should be watered when the first fingertip of the soil is dry. Which is about once every five days to a week.

6" Plants should be watered when the first inch- inch and a half of the soil is dry. Which is about once every ten days to two weeks.

10" Plants should be watered when the first two to three inches of the soil is dry. Which is once every two to three weeks.

14" Plants should be watered when the first three inches of the soil is dry. Which is once every three weeks to a month.

*however, the specific watering schedule depends on the type of plant and the size of the current planter.

For more information, please contact us.